The Code is the fundamental and universal document upon which the World Anti-Doping Program is based. Its purpose is to advance the anti-doping effort through universal harmonization of core anti-doping elements. It is intended to be specific enough to achieve complete harmonization on issues where uniformity is required, yet general enough in other areas to permit flexibility on how agreed-upon anti-doping principles are implemented.

The Code has been drafted giving consideration to the principles of proportionality and human rights.

For the full 2021 Code Review please see: https://www.wada-ama.org/en/what-we-do/the-code/2021-code-review

 

The Court of Arbitration for Sport, which ruled on a Sports-related arbitration on 5 January 2017, found that Guyanese cyclist Alanzo Greaves was guilty of an ADRV in accordance with Article 2.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code, during his participation in the Tour of Guyana 5 Stage Cycle Road Race in November 2015.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has now published its respective Anti-Doping Rules (Rules) for the 2020 Winter Youth Olympic Games in Lausanne (to be held in January 2020) and for the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo (to be held in July and August 2020).

Bridgetown, 25 January, 2017 – The Caribbean Regional Anti-Doping Organization (RADO) has accepted the ruling of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on the Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV) case in the matter of cyclist Alanzo Greaves.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport, which ruled on a Sports-related arbitration on 5 January 2017, found that Guyanese cyclist Alanzo Greaves was guilty of an ADRV in accordance with Article 2.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code, during his participation in the Tour of Guyana 5 Stage Cycle Road Race in November 2015.

KUWAIT, Jan 21 (KUNA) -- The Third Conference of the Regional Anti-Doping Organizations (RADO) kicked off Tuesday with the participation of representatives of 123 countries, [including Caribbean RADO representatives Dr. Adrian Lorde (Chairman) and Mrs. Tessa Chaderton-Shaw (Executive Director)].

By Renee Anne Shirley

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Asafa Powell was one of five Jamaicans to test positive before this year's world championships.
Getty Images

The 2013 world track and field championships finished on Sunday, and the might of Jamaican sprinting was—once again—on display for the world to see. During the nine-day event in Moscow, Jamaican men won four of the six medals available in the 100- and 200-meter races, and took gold in the 4x100-meter relay. Jamaica's Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won the 100 and 200, and the Jamaican women triumphed in the 4x100-meter relay.
 
There can be no doubt that the tiny island of 2.7 million is the world's preeminent sprint factory. And now the island needs a world-class anti-doping operation to go with its achievements on the track.

On Friday 9 November 2012, 7 new project proposals, totaling US$ 115,595.29, were approved by the Approval Committee for the UNESCO Fund for the Elimination of Doping in Sport in a meeting that was held at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris (France). These 7 projects will bring the total number of national and international projects, supported by the Fund since its establishment in 2008, to 80 initiatives worth more than US$ 1.3 million.